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CARES Act FAQs from Congress Woman Carolyn B. Maloney
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Carolyn B. Maloney

On Monday, Inspector General Michael Horowitz took a strong first step toward implementing the oversight requirements included in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act by quickly appointing a Chair for the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee (PRAC). This committee was created by one of the provisions Carolyn B. Maloney offered to the CARES Act as Chairwoman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform.

Maloney’s office created this FAQ sheet for small businesses and nonprofits to help you navigate some of these new resources.



Emergency Paid Sick Leave Explained

Looking for an easy digestible explanation of how the Emergency Paid Sick Leave works for companies under 500 employees?  Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

– Effective April 2nd 2020 for groups UNDER 500 EMPLOYEES

*A business closure does NOT warrant Paid Sick Leave!*

– All employees are eligible, regardless of tenure
– Differences between Full Time & Part Time Employees
– Full Time: 80 hours of fully compensated time off
– Part Time: Entitled to the Average number of hours worked over 2 weeks



Covid-19: How the CARES Act and Other Recent Legislation Impact Your Business

Federal CARES Act for Nonprofits - Pandemic Stimulus ...

As we know there is so much information out there right now revolving around Covid-10.  If you are looking for how the CARES Act and other legislation will impact your business, please read below for a helpful article we received from Olivera Medenica, Partner of Dunnington, Bartholow & Miller LLP.

Within the past few days—and as recently as 72 hours ago—the United States government, the State of New York and the City of New York adopted legislation intended to provide economic relief to businesses and individuals impacted by the COVID-19 emergency. The following is a review of various loans, loan forgiveness provisions, and other benefits created by these recent acts.*

U.S. Federal Laws

On March 27, 2020, an approximately $2 trillion coronavirus response bill, the Coronavirus Aid Relief, and Economic Security (“CARES”) Act (H.R. 748), was signed into law.

The CARES Act:

  1. Provides Forgivable Loans to Small Businesses

Under the CARES Act’s Paycheck Protection Program, the Small Business Administration (the “SBA”) will back loans of up to $10 million from banks to businesses with not more than 500 employees for those businesses to pay employee salaries, paid sick or medical leave, health insurance premiums, and basic immediate operating expenses like mortgage, rent, and utility payments (“Covered Expenses”).

Borrower Eligibility

There are very few borrower requirements to obtain a loan under the CARES Act. Those requirements include a good-faith certification that the borrower (a) needs the loan to continue operations during the COVID-19 pandemic, (b) will use the funds to retain workers and maintain payroll, or pay the other immediate operating costs, (c) does not have any other pending application under this program for the same purpose, and (d) has not received duplicative amounts under this program from February 15, 2020 until December 31, 2020.

Eligible businesses include private and public non-profits, sole proprietorships, individuals who are self-employed, and businesses with not more than 500 employees (including full-time and part-time employees) per location. For businesses in the hospitality and dining industries, there is a special eligibility rule: if the business has more than one physical location, it employs not more than 500 employees per physical location, and it is assigned to the “Accommodation and Food services” sector (Sector 72) of the North American Industry Classification System, that business is eligible for a loan.

Notably, the CARES Act includes a “Sense of the Senate” that the SBA should issue guidance to lenders to ensure that the processing and disbursements of loans prioritizes small businesses in underserved and rural markets, small businesses owned by individuals who are socially or economically disadvantaged, women owned businesses, and businesses that have been in operation for less than two years.

The Loan Amount

The maximum loan amount (the “Loan Amount”) is the lesser of (a) 2.5 multiplied by the average total monthly payroll costs incurred from the previous one-year period (plus the outstanding amount of any loan that the business received under the SBA’s Disaster Loan Program between January 31, 2020 and the date on which that loan may have been refinanced as part of the Paycheck Protection Program (“Prior SBA Loan Amount”)), or (b) for businesses that were not in existence from February 15, 2019 to June 30, 2019, 2.5 multiplied by the average total monthly payroll costs incurred from January 1, 2020 to February 29, 2020 (plus any Prior SBA Loan Amount), or (c) $10 million. Payroll costs include compensation to independent contractors (including compensation based on commission) up to $100,000 in one year.

Loan Forgiveness

A borrower is entitled to loan forgiveness in an amount equal to Covered Expenses paid during the 8-week period following loan origination (the “Loan Forgiveness Covered Period”). Forgiveness is subject to reduction based on a reduction of the business’s employees, and wages and salaries as explained below (the “Forgiveness Amount”).

To calculate the Forgiveness Amount, the Act instructs to multiply the total of the Covered Expenses incurred during the Loan Forgiveness Covered Period by the result of dividing the average number of full-time equivalent employees (“FTEEs”) that the business employed per month during the 8-week Loan Forgiveness Covered Period, by (at the election of the borrower) either (a) the average number of FTEEs that the business employed per month from February 15, 2019 to June 30, 2019, or (b) the average number of FTEEs that the businesses employed per month from January 1, 2020 to February 29, 2020. The Act also provides that employees whom the business laid off between February 15, 2020 and April 26, 2020, but rehired by June 30, 2020 will, in effect, be treated as employed individuals during the 8-week Loan Forgiveness Covered Period so as not to reduce the Forgiveness Amount.

The Forgiveness Amount will be reduced by the amount of employee salary reduction in excess of 25% of that employee’s total salary during the most recent full quarter during which the employee was employed before the Loan Forgiveness Covered Period. Thus, if the business did not reduce employee salary or wages during the Loan Forgiveness Covered Period by more than 25%, the Forgiveness Amount will not be reduced in this manner.

It is important for businesses to document the use of its funds received under the program pursuant to the documentation provisions in the CARES Act because businesses that to do not properly document their use may be ineligible for loan forgiveness.

Application Process

Businesses can apply for the loans through private sector lenders authorized by the SBA who can use their own paperwork to process the loans. It is estimated that it will take about two weeks for the SBA to approve each loan, and to guarantee it against default. Lenders will not distribute the loan money to businesses until the SBA has assured it that each loan is fully backed, so it may take at least two weeks from applying for the loan for businesses to start receiving the loan money.

Business owners are not required to provide personal guarantees or use their assets as collateral for the loan. There are no fees associated with obtaining the loan, and interest rates are capped at 4%.

  1. Provides Emergency EIDL Grants

The CARES Act provides, in certain circumstances, emergency Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) grants of up to $10,000 from the SBA to small businesses for those businesses to use the funds for, among other things, providing paid sick leave for employees, maintaining payroll, meeting increased costs due to an interrupted supply chain, and making rent or mortgage payments. It is currently uncertain as to what impact, if any, obtaining an emergency grant under this provision may have on applications made under the Paycheck Protection Program.

  1. Expands Unemployment Benefits

Under the CARES Act’s temporary Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program, workers not usually eligible for state and federal unemployment benefits—such as independent contractors, and people who are self-employed or who have a limited work history—may receive unemployment benefits if they are unable to work because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Anyone who self-certifies that they are able and available to work but is unemployed or partially unemployed because of the COVID-19 pandemic is considered a “covered individual.” If workers have the ability to work remotely with pay, they are not eligible for these benefits.

Under the CARES Act, unemployment benefits are available for the weeks of unemployment, partial unemployment, or inability to work caused by COVID-19 beginning on or after January 27, 2020 (the date on which the Secretary of Health declared COVID-19 a public health emergency) and ending on or before December 31, 2020, and shall continue to be available as long as the individual’s unemployment, partial unemployment, or inability to work continues, for up to 39 weeks. Individuals will receive the amount that would be calculated under state law plus $600 each week for up to four months, as opposed to the usual three months. Additionally, the standard one-week waiting period is waived, so laid off employees immediately qualify for benefits.

  1. Provides Refundable Payroll Tax Credit to Employers

For businesses whose operations were fully or partially suspended by a government entity due to the COVID-19 pandemic or had a decrease in gross receipts of 50% or more compared to the same quarter last year, the CARES Act provides for a refundable payroll tax credit equal to 50% of the first $10,000 in wages per employee. This payroll tax credit can be claimed for employees who are retained but who do not work during the COVID-19 pandemic. Businesses with 100 or fewer full-time employees can claim the payroll tax credit for all employees’ wages—whether the employer is open for business or has been ordered to close. Businesses with more than 100 full-time employees can claim the credit for employees who are retained but who do not work due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

New York City and New York State Laws

Employers that employ at least two employees in New York State seeking to avoid layoffs should also know about the Shared Work Program, which provides partial unemployment benefits to employees who are working reduced hours. To participate, employers must design a “Shared Work Plan” and apply to participate here at least one week before the proposed effective date. After an employer’s plan is approved, participating employees must file unemployment insurance Shared Work claims. Eligible employees include those who qualify to receive unemployment insurance benefits in New York state and who normally work no more than 40 hours per week. Covered employees may receive up to 26 weeks of regular Shared Work benefits in one year. Currently, it is unclear how employers would take advantage of the New York State Shared Work Program and the Federal Paycheck Protection Program simultaneously. One potential scenario is that the reduction in salary and wages under the Shared Work Program may reduce the amount of the loan forgiveness under the Paycheck Protection Program.

Under New York City’s Employee Retention Grant Program, small business in New York City (including nonprofits) that have been in operation for at least six months, with one to four employees that can demonstrate at least a 25% decrease in revenue as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic may be eligible to receive a grant covering up to 40% of their payroll for two months, for a maximum of up to $27,000. This program was implemented to help New York City businesses retain employees. More information can be found here.

Under New York City’s Small Business Continuity Loan Program, businesses in New York City with fewer than 100 employees that can demonstrate at least a 25% decrease in revenue as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and that it has the ability to repay the loan, may be eligible for an interest-free loan up of up to $75,000 to help retain employees and continue business operations. More information can be found here.

*Evolving Regulation and Implementation Procedures

The foregoing is intended as a summary of the various measures enacted within the past few days. The legislation examined above was understandably passed under exigent circumstances. Most, if not all, of the above will be subject to rule-making and interpretation. Therefore, implementation structures, procedures and subsequent regulations may vary from the analysis presented above.

For questions about the foregoing and further developments, please contact us. We also have assembled resources and alerts for COVID-19-related legal issues and considerations on our website under “News – COVID-19 Guidance.” Please check there for useful information and updates as events evolve.

*Required Disclaimer: This alert is provided for informational purposes and does not constitute, and should not be considered legal advice. Specific facts and circumstances will differ. Neither the transmission nor the receipt of this information shall create an attorney-client relationship between the transmitter and the recipient. You should not take, or refrain from taking, any action based upon information contained in this alert without consulting legal counsel of your own choosing. Under applicable professional rules of conduct, this informational publication may be considered attorney advertising.

Dunnington, Bartholow & Miller LLP is a full-service law firm providing corporate, employment, litigation, arbitration, mediation, intellectual property, real estate, immigration, trusts and estates planning services for national and international clientele. Find out more at www.dunnington.com.

 



FMLA Expansion for Covid-19 Explained

Curious how the expansion of FMLA will affect you or your business?  Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.



Families First Coronavirus Response Act Simple Flow Chart

Family_PortraitWe’ve been receiving many questions regarding the Emergency FMLA and Emergency Paid Sick Leave Provisions of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act. To help you and your clients understand this new law one of our industry partners, Professional Group Plans, has put together a simple flow chart that makes it easy to determine who qualifies and the benefit required for each provision.

Families First Coronavirus Response Act Simple Flow Chart



Financing and Loan Options to Weather Covid-19 Crisis

moneyAs we know there is so much information out there right now.  If you are looking for different ways to find funding during the Covid-19 Pandemic, please read below for a helpful article written by Sally Anne Hughes of Hughes Klaiber.

 

Over the past few days, we have been gathering information on financing and loan sources to help companies weather the COVID-19 crisis. Here are some general thoughts and recommendations. We will add to this as more information becomes available.

1. Banks.

Unlike 2008, banks currently have strong balance sheets. Therefore they are potentially well positioned to help businesses with liquidity issues.

  • First step, call your existing banks and lenders.  Your existing banker may be the best option for access to additional credit, to extend or reinstate a line of credit. If you have not already done so, call your banker.
  • If you have any existing debt, and your business has been impacted by COVID-19, you may be able to defer payments. Most major banks are offering deferrals on debt for 90 days. On March 21, Governor Cuomo issued an Executive Order stating that banks (those subject to the jurisdiction of the NYS Department of Financial Services) must grant a forbearance to any person or business facing financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic for 90 days. If they do not, it would be deemed “an unsafe and unsound business practice.”
  • The bank is going to want a story as to how you plan to come out of this. Put together a plan now.
  • Here are sites for various banks on the Coronavirus response, numbers to call, etc.:

2. State, local and community loan programs.

  • NYC has a range of programs: click here
  • Here is an option for certain NYC neighborhoods:  click here
  • There is also a program for business in Philadelphia: click here
  • Los Angeles micro loan program: click here

3. Small Business Administration (SBA).

  • In normal times, SBA loans (including 7(a) and 504 loans) are issued by banks, and the loans are guaranteed by the SBA if the borrower defaults.
  • An SBA disaster loan is issued directly by the SBA, for counties that are declared disaster zones, which includes all of NYC and most surrounding areas. Here is the site for the SBA disaster loan application. https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/  You may want to access the site during off-off hours, it has been slow and down for maintenance. Rates are 3.75%. Disaster loans are capped at $2 million. They cannot be used to acquire fixed assets or to pay back shareholder loans. TBD how long a disaster loan will take to get approved. The SBA is supposedly rolling out a new processing system with a large mortgage processor on Monday, March 30, that will take application time down to 3-5 days. The SBA is also providing daily webinars on how to apply. Check here.
  • The relief package passed by the Senate on March 25 2020), the CARES Act, includes major modifications to the 7(a) loan program, designed to help small businesses meet their ongoing expenses and keep employees on payroll. The portion of the loan that is used for payroll and debt obligations may be forgiven, subject to reductions if number of employees is reduced compared to last year. Funds used for other purposes must be repaid.
  • The maximum amount available under this program is the lesser of a) 2.5x the average monthly payroll total; or b) $10 million.
  • This legislation still needs to go to the House and be signed by the President.
  • TBD what provisions will be included to support business owners who have a previously issued SBA loan.
  • There is a provision in the act that provides payment deferment relief on 7(a) loans for a period of not more than one year. TBD how this will play out.
  • This program will administered through bank lenders, not directly through the SBA. Another reason to call your banker.
  • Every impacted business owner who thinks they may need to access this program can prepare now by setting up a data room with all of the typical information a bank will need, so that you can quickly provide it to your banker when the program is up and running. Information to pull together should include a description of how their business has been impacted in terms of revenues, current cash position, detail of costs you have been able to or are trying to cut (rent included), detailed schedule of the monthly expenses of the business, payroll information, plus three years business tax returns, 12/31/2019 year end financials, business debt schedule, entity documents, and copies of leases.
  • You may not be able to get BOTH a disaster loan and a 7(a) loan if they are both to be used for payroll purposes.

4. Facebook Small Business Grants Program: Facebook is offering $100 million in cash grants and ad credits to businesses experiencing disruptions as a result of COVID-19. The application is not yet live, but you can sign up to receive information here.

5. Factoring. Several factor companies are currently providing accounts receivable and purchase order financing. Although fees will vary, the cost associated with factoring is likely to be significantly higher than most other type of financing. However, you may be able to get financing in 5-7 days, with less paperwork. Find out if you can pick and choose which accounts to sell and which invoices to finance, and if there are minimum size requirements.

Please contact us at info@hughesklaiber.com for any help, updates and introductions to lenders we know and have worked with. Please bear in mind that this information is evolving. Please check with us or your banker for any recent updates and changes to this information.



Practical Information & Resource Guide for You & Your Business during the Covid-19 Pandemic

Combs & Co Logo 11-16 (2)

We understand there have been numerous emails out there each day on Covid-19, believe us, we get about 50 a day as of late.  Below you’ll find helpful information broken into section topics for what your needs may be during this time.  We know we will all get through this, we are New Yorkers and we have seen far worse in our day.  Stay safe.

The Combs Crew

Business Interruption:

One thing to understand is that your broker serves in the role as an insurance intermediaries we are not the decision maker, but instead report claims and administer the communication between the carrier and the customer.  As brokers, we represent you as the client, not the insurers.  We are your advocates and will fight for you, but ultimately the decision rests on the carrier.

We all know this is a very stressful time all Small Businesses across the country and are getting multiple requests a day about coverage of a potential claim for Business Interruption.  Unfortunately, the carriers are being very tight lipped on if the Covid-19 would result in a Business Interruption claim being paid until they are able to review all aspects of the policy and claim.  We have been suggesting to all of our clients, to go ahead and move forward with a claim if they are able to prove a loss for their business during this time as there is zero chance of recovery if you never put in a claim.

Facts about Business Interruption:

  1. If you have Business Interruption coverage, your policy should list or describe the type of events it covers.  Events that are not listed on, or not described in the policy, are typically not covered.
  2. Business Interruption coverage typically can ONLY be triggered if you have a property loss that leads to the business interruption.
  3. Often times there are exclusions for epidemics and pandemics in Business Interruption policies.

Example:  You have a fire in your office which has caused you to suspend your business activities, for more information CLICK HERE

Many state and city municipalities are working on Disaster Loan Assistance programs at this time, below you will find that information.

Disaster Loan Assistance:

For Disaster Loan assistance information by state, please CLICK HERE for more information from the SBA.  If you are local to NYC, CLICK HERE for local disaster loan assistance.

Please let us know if we can assist in any way during this time and if you are looking for overall general information on potential business impacts and resources, please CLICK HERE for Risk Advisory bulletins from EPIC.

Health Insurance:

For Individuals – NY State of Health and New York State Department of Financial Services Announce Special Enrollment Period for Uninsured New Yorkers, as Novel Coronavirus Cases Climb.

*Remind New Yorkers That There is No Cost Sharing for COVID-19 Testing Across Medicaid, Child Health Plus, Essential Plan, and Qualified Health Plans*

ALBANY, N.Y. (March 16, 2020) – NY State of Health, together with the New York State Department of Financial Services (DFS), today announced that New York will make a Special Enrollment Period available to New Yorkers during which eligible individuals will be able to enroll in insurance coverage through NY State of Health, New York’s official health plan Marketplace, and directly through insurers. This step is being taken in light of the COVID-19 public health emergency to further protect the public health of New Yorkers.  NY State of Health, DFS, and New York State health insurers are taking this action due to the exceptional nature of the public health emergency posed by the COVID-19 so that individuals do not avoid seeking testing or medical care for fear of cost. The open enrollment period for coverage in 2020 had previously ended on February 7, 2020.

Individuals who enroll in Qualified Health Plans through NY State of Health or directly through insurers between March 16 and April 15, 2020 will have coverage effective starting April 1, 2020.  Individuals who are eligible for other NY State of Health programs – Medicaid, Essential Plan and Child Health Plus – can enroll year-round.  As always, consumers can apply for coverage through NY State of Health on-line at www.nystateofhealth.ny.gov , by phone at 855-355-5777, and working with enrollment assistors.

If you have any questions or would like more personalized assistance, please reach out to Colleen Blum via email at:  cblum@combsandco.com

Workers Compensation:

Workers’ compensation insurance helps employees recover from work-related injuries or illnesses. Every state has its own workers’ compensation insurance laws and regulations that govern the coverage available. To file a workers’ compensation claim, the employee will need to demonstrate that the injury or illness arose both out of and in the course of their employment.

Mental Health Assistance: 

Many health insurance carriers are providing Mental Health Assistance at this time.  Below is some information on what United / Oxford is doing for their members and in some instances all citizens regardless if they are a member.  Please reach out to your health insurance provider to see what services they are providing specifically for you.

Free Emotional Support Help Line

Optum is offering a free emotional support help line for all individuals impacted.  Our toll-free emotional support help line at (866) 342-6892 is free of charge and available to anyone, so you can share it with family and friends. Caring professionals will connect people to resources. It will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Additionally, there are several coping and disaster tools and resources available to you on liveandworkwell.com. Log on to liveandworkwell.com with your HealthSafeID. Type the keywords “coping” or “disaster” into the search bar to get support.

Behavioral Health Virtual Visits

Also, as UnitedHealthcare members, you have access to Behavioral Health Virtual Visits where you can access a behavioral health professional through your mobile device, tablet, or computer.  Behavioral Health Virtual Visits are a separate benefit from the Virtual Visits with Teledoc, Amwell, and Doc on Demand.  For behavioral health, virtual visits are subject to the same out of pocket as an in-office visit (behavioral health outpatient office visit). Services are delivered by a network provider licensed within your state and may include psychiatrists, psychologists, and other practitioners licensed in behavioral health such as nurse practitioners and master level clinicians. Providers are able to prescribe medications in compliance with federal and other regulatory limitations.

Coronavirus Response Bill, with Required Paid Sick Leave, Enacted into Law:

Action Taken:  On March 18, 2020 President Trump signed into law H.R.6201, a $104 billion bill that, among other things, requires small employers (those with fewer than 500 employees) to provide paid sick leave to employees dealing with COVID-19 or with exposure to the coronavirus.  Family and medical leave both go into effect April 2 and expire December 31, 2020.  

 

Expanded FMLA.

    1. Who? The new law applies to all employers with fewer than 500 employees and to employees who have worked for at least 30 days.
    2. Reasons for Leave? An employee may take up to 12 weeks of leave to allow an employee who is unable to work or telework to care for the employee’s child (under 18 years of age) if the child’s school or place of care is closed or the childcare provider is unavailable due to a public health emergency. A public health emergency means an emergency with respect to COVID-19 declared by a federal, state, or local authority.
    3. Pay? Unpaid for the first 10-days after which the employer must pay full-time employees at two-thirds the employee’s regular rate for the number of hours the employee would otherwise be normally scheduled. The pay is limited to $200 per day and $10,000 in the aggregate. Part-time employees pay should be based on the average number of hours the employee worked for prior six months; or, if less than six months, based on the employee’s reasonable expectation at hiring of the average number of hours the employee would be scheduled to work.
    4. Job protection? Employers with 25 + employees have to return the employee to the same or equivalent position upon their return to work. Employers with fewer than 25 employees are excluded from this requirement if the employee’s position is eliminated due to economic conditions or other changes resulting from the public health emergency. Keep in mind, employers must still reasonably attempt to return the employee to an equivalent position and make efforts for the next year to return the employee to work.
    5. Exempt? The law allows small businesses with fewer than 50 employees to seek an exemption from the expanded leave entirely if the required leave would jeopardize the viability of their business.

Paid Sick Leave.

  1. Who? Employers with fewer than 500 employees; all employees regardless of their tenure
  2. Reasons for Leave?  An employee may take paid sick leave if he/she is unable to work or telework because:
    • the employee is subject to a federal, state, or local quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19;
    • a health care provider advised the employee to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19 (self-imposed quarantine does not qualify);
    • the employee is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis;
    • the employee is caring for an individual who is either subject to a federal, state, or local quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19 or has been advised to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19;
    • the employee is caring for the employee’s child whose school has been closed or place of care is unavailable due to COVID-19 precautions; or
    • the employee is experiencing any other substantially similar condition as specified by the government (and to be clarified later).
  1. Pay? Full-time employees receive 80 hours of paid sick leave; part-time employees receive the equivalent of the number of hours they would work, on average, during a two-week period.  Paid sick leave is paid at the employee’s regular rate if for a reason in paragraph (i), (ii), or (iii) above and caped at $511 per day and $5,110 in the aggregate; and two-thirds of an employee’s regular rate if based on reason (iv), (v), or (vi) and capped at $200 per day and $2,000 in the aggregate.
  2. Misc. The leave does not carry over. Employers may not require employees to first use other paid leave before using paid sick leave. Employers can require reasonable notice procedures after the first workday that an employee receives paid sick leave. Employers must post a notice that advises employees of their rights which should be available by March 25.
  3. Exempt? Like the FMLA above, the Act does contain language allowing small business with less than 50 employees to seek an exemption from the requirement.

New York Emergency Paid Sick Leave.

  1. When? Only in the event of a “mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine or isolation issued by the State of New York, the NY Department of Health, a local board of health, or any government entity duly authorized to issue such order due to COVID-19”.
  2. Who?
    • Employers with 10 or fewer employees and a net income less than $1 million must provide unpaid leave (and job protection) for the duration of the quarantine order and guarantee their workers access to Paid Family Leave and disability benefits (short-term disability) for the period of quarantine including wage replacement for their salaries up to $150,000.
    • Employers with 11-99 employees and employers with 10 or fewer employees and a net income greater than $1 million will provide at least 5 days of paid sick leave, job protection for the duration of the quarantine order, and guarantee their workers access to Paid Family Leave and disability benefits (short-term disability) for the period of quarantine including wage replacement for their salaries up to $150,000.
    • Employers with 100 or more employees, as well as all public employers (regardless of number of employees), will provide at least 14 days of paid sick leave and guarantee job protection for the duration of the quarantine order.
  1. Has to be serious? These additional benefits are only available to employees who have been officially and formally quarantined or isolated by a local or state government agency; not those who are in voluntary quarantine or isolation, those who merely fear they have been infected, those who object to reporting to work, and those who are placed on leave, layoff, or furlough by an employer. It also does not apply to employees who are asymptomatic but have been quarantined or isolated, those who have not yet been diagnosed with any medical condition, and those who are physically able to work remotely.
  2. Other Changes.
    • With regards to NY Paid Family Leave, the definition of “disability” was expanded to include “the inability to do work because of a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine,”; and the definition of “family leave” was expanded to include a) leave taken to comply with a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine; or b) to provide care for the employee’s minor, dependent child who is subject to a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine.

Don’t forget, these are in addition to any current paid leave/medical leave programs applicable to your workforce.

Resources for Families:

We know that many families are struggling to figure out homeschooling at this time while balancing working from home in most cases.  We wanted to share this excellent post from the Today Show that provides a wealth of information for your little ones during this time, CLICK HERE for the article “How to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis with free resources”.

Job Resources:

Chameleon Resume is offering free tools to help with job searches.  CLICK HERE to access them.

New York & New Jersey has developed a state portals to access jobs that are looking for candidates now during the Covid-19 pandemic.

CLICK HERE to access the New York portal

CLICK HERE to access the New Jersey portal

To Apply for NY State Unemployment, CLICK HERE

To Apply for NJ State Unemployment, CLICK HERE



Carrier Benefits Coronavirus (Covid-19) Chart
syringe and pills with petri dish

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

As we have been getting several clients that have been reaching out and asking on what would be covered under their health insurance in terms of testing and treatment we wanted to share this helpful chart identifying what the Fully Insured carriers will be doing that our General Agent, Savoy Associates published.

Feel free to reach out with any questions, and remember….WASH YOUR HANDS!

Carrier Benefits Coronavirus Chart

 



Tribute to my Father

Major General Roger E Combs (February 22, 1945 – August 22, 2018)

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Husband, Father, Grandpa, Brother, Son, Uncle, Friend, Mentor, Servant, General and Judge.  He’s gone by so many titles over the years.

He was born on the family farm in rural Stanberry, Missouri on February 22, 1945.  He was known for quoting a Senator who said, “When you’re born on a dairy farm, everything else is easy.”

He shared his successes with those he loved, like the incredible experience of his promotion party when he was given his 2nd Star (Major General).  He invited all his “circles” – family, church, courthouse, and military.  He had a Wikipedia page and hardly anyone in the family or King City knew about it.

This is how he lived.  He could talk to anyone.  No matter the successes he achieved, he never forgot he was that boy who was born on a farm and attended a one-room schoolhouse.  He was the son of H.H. and Ruby Fern.

He was a teacher.

This man taught me, “It’s important for you to be understood, but it’s more important for you to not be misunderstood.”  I think one of us kids quotes this weekly.

This man taught me to be independent and have a common knowledge of how to fix some things.  Then if all else fails, WD-40 and duct tape will fix almost anything.

This man taught me to parallel park between a horse trailer and a feed truck out on the Mule Shoe Ranch.  Living in NYC, this skill has become priceless.

But most importantly, this man taught me there are three major aspects of my life and he basically broke it down to me like this: “You have the person you are with, the place where you live, and the thing you do for a living.  If you’re happy with 3 out of 3 then you are living a golden life; but on any given day, if you can be happy in at least 2 of those aspects, you’re doing just fine.  But if you’re happy with only one or none, then get off your butt and do something about it.  Surround yourself with supportive people who “get” you; to whom you don’t have to explain yourself.  Live in a place that excites you and that cultivates who you are and who you want to be.  Choose to do something you love because invariably you’ll do it well.” He was a living example of this by showing us a deep love for our mother, passion for his career, and a fondness for his community.

His life was the definition of God, Family, and Country.  He had integrity, love, and sheer grit.  He loved his family, community, church, courthouse crew, and his brothers and sisters of the armed forces, with whom he served for more than 39 years.  The outpouring of stories and notes we have received reinforce the fact that he was not only our hero, but a hero to many.  He was the guy who would mentor young officers in the military; he made children feel safe when their home lives were in disarray during custody hearings; he would snow blow downtown King City to make sure the merchants were safe in the winter; he took the time to care when there were no witnesses.

He was a fighter.

Most recognizably as a CH-46 Helicopter pilot for the Purple Foxes in the US Marine Corp and until the very end, as he battled Agent Orange-related throat cancer for the past decade.  He never gave up and he never surrendered, until God took mercy on his soul on August 22, 2018.

To say this past year has changed me would be an understatement.  He helped make me who I am today.  I have been and will always be proud to call him my father and know that he still lives within each of the many lives he touched all over the world.  Over the past year of his life, I am so grateful that I was able to take the time, be quick to listen, fierce to love, slower to say yes to everything, and to find the serenity when I could.

You’ll always be in our hearts.

Susan



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