combsandco


How to Decide Which Employees to Bring Back from Furlough

Strategizing on how to bring some furloughed employees back?  Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

 

1. Create a staffing plan that revolves around the needs of the COMPANY first. Ask yourself where you anticipate being busy and where you may be slower. Create a plan accordingly.
2. Choose which staff return based on unique skill sets needed, overall job performance, seniority/tenure, or their willingness to do jobs outside of their normal scope.
3. DO NOT discriminate based on age, perceived disabilities, or by retaliating for taking paid sick leave.

Make sure to DOCUMENT your process ahead of time and COMMUNICATE to your staff your plan to avoid unnecessary stress for everyone.

*REMEMBER TO ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR ATTORNEY OR HUMAN RESOURCES VENDOR FOR ADVICE* If you need these types of vendors, we can refer you to them.



Section 125 Considerations for Mid-Year Enrollments

Looking for an easy digestible explanation what considerations to make for Mid-Year Enrollments under a Section 125 plan? Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

 

Special Mid-Year Enrollment Window

1. Get Approval from Health Insurer in writing. If Self-funded, approval comes from stop-loss carrier.
2. Decide if these special deductions will be pre-tax or post-tax. As of right now, the IRS has issued no guidance for pre-tax elections due to COVID-19.

Section 125 Mid Year Election Change Events:
1. Change in employment status if the change impacts eligibility for health plan
2. A significant change in health plan coverage
3. HIPAA Special Enrollment (marriage, birth, etc)

To avoid any unintended liability, employers should check with your CPA and/or attorney to decide what is best for your business.



Stay Safe – Understanding the Symptoms of Covid-19

Just some quick information on symptoms of Covid-19 and what to do if you think you may be infected.



How CARES Act Impacts Employer Health Plans

Curious how the CARES Act will impact Employer Health Plans? Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) into law to provide $2.2 trillion in federal funding to address the COVID-19 crisis. The CARES Act makes a variety of changes affecting health plans. These changes include:

1. Expanding the types of coronavirus testing that all health plans and health insurance issuers must cover without cost-sharing (such as deductibles, copayments or coinsurance) or prior authorization

2. Accelerating the process that will require health plans and issuers to cover preventive services and vaccines related to COVID-19

3. Allowing telehealth and other remote care services to be covered under a high deductible health plan (HDHP) before the deductible is met, without affecting the HDHP’s compatibility with health savings accounts (HSAs) (applicable for HDHP plan years beginning on or before Dec. 31, 2021)

4. Treating over-the-counter (OTC) medications, along with menstrual care products, as qualified medical expenses that may be paid for using HSAs or other tax-advantaged arrangements, such as health flexible spending accounts (FSAs) or health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs)



4 Ways to Keep Health Coverage

Here are 4 quick ways to keep your health insurance coverage by our Combs & Company friend, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

This is for employees who have lost coverage through an Employer Sponsored Plan.

1) COBRA- Contact your Benefits Administrator. Remember, there is no employer contribution so this is an expensive option.

2) Spouse Plan- This Qualifying Life Event (loss of coverage) creates a window of opportunity to join your spouse’s health plan. Contact your spouse’s Benefits Administrator for pricing.

3) Medicaid- A severe loss of income may qualify you for Medicaid at http://www.medicaid.gov

4) Healthcare.gov – The QLE allows you 60 days to enroll in an individual plan on the marketplace.



Small Business Exemptions for Paid Sick Leave Explained
Looking for an easy digestible explanation of the exemptions for companies under Paid Sick Leave? Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.
DOL Clarifies Exemptions to Coronavirus Paid Sick Leave Laws
– Less than 50 employees
– Leave is requested because the child’s school or place of care is closed due to COVID-19 related reasons
– An authorized officer of business has determined that at least one of the 3 conditions described below have been met:
1) The provision would result in small business’s expenses and financial obligations to exceed available business revenue and cause business to cease operating at minimal capacity
2) The employee requesting leave has a specific set of skills and knowledge that without it, the business’s financial and operational health is severely threatened
3) There are not sufficient workers who are able, willing and qualified to perform duties of person requesting leave and this would not allow business to operate at minimal capacity.
DOL is encouraging employers and employees to work together to find a solution during this time that allows the business to be maintained as well as the safety of employees.

 

 

 



Staying Healthy During the Covid-19 Pandemic

Just some quick tips to stay healthy during the Covid-19 Pandemic!



Federal Loan Forgiveness CARES Act

Curious how the forgivable loans work under the CARES Act?  Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

Coronavirus Aid and Relief Economic Security Act
Emergency grants: The bill provides $10 billion for grants of up to $10,000 to provide emergency funds for small businesses to cover immediate operating costs.
The application process ends on June 30th (“The Covered Period”)
Forgivable loans: There is $350 billion allocated for the Small Business Administration to provide loans of up to $10 million per business. Any portion of that loan used to maintain payroll, keep workers on the books or pay for rent, mortgage and existing debt could be forgiven, provided workers stay employed through the end of June.
Relief for existing loans: There is $17 billion to cover six months of payments for small businesses already using SBA loans.


Federal Payroll Tax Credits for Paying Sick Leave

Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial. Chelsea explains how eligible employer tax credits will fully reimburse employers for all qualifying sick and child-care leave payments mandated under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act by REDUCING PAYROLL TAXES owed to the IRS.

*Employers will be entitled to an ADDITIONAL CREDIT for the cost of MAINTAINING HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE!*

– Employers will be able to file for accelerated payments to refund employers for qualifying leave payments in excess of federal payroll taxes owed.

– Small businesses will be eligible for an exemption to the mandated sick and leave payments if they demonstrate that payment of child-care leave under the Act threatens the viability of their business.

– Enforcement actions will be delayed by thirty days for employers that act reasonably and in good faith to comply with the Act.

*Note: Information is changing daily, please check with Dept of Labor and/or an employment attorney for exact information*



Emergency Paid Sick Leave Explained

Looking for an easy digestible explanation of how the Emergency Paid Sick Leave works for companies under 500 employees?  Check out this great video from colleague, Chelsea Whalley of J Donovan Financial.

– Effective April 2nd 2020 for groups UNDER 500 EMPLOYEES

*A business closure does NOT warrant Paid Sick Leave!*

– All employees are eligible, regardless of tenure
– Differences between Full Time & Part Time Employees
– Full Time: 80 hours of fully compensated time off
– Part Time: Entitled to the Average number of hours worked over 2 weeks